Posted 4 days ago
My alone feels so good, I’ll only have you if you’re sweeter than my solitude.
Warsan Shire

(Source: afro-dominicano)

Posted 6 days ago

"No one will miss me", "I’m better off dead"

after-crisis:

When I worked at a non-profit that handled suicide prevention, I had access to the donation records. Each month, a specific man donated 15$ to our organization. It was like clockwork.. same day, same man, he had been doing this for over 4 years. It always seemed odd to me but I never questioned it… until I saw a note attached one month. "For Noah- Dad"

his donation was once his child’s allowance.

I can promise you, they would miss you for the rest of their lives.

Posted 6 days ago

Shake it Off (Piano) - Taylor Swift

(Source: boewing)

Posted 1 week ago
If we can’t write diversity into sci-fi, then what’s the point? You don’t create new worlds to give them all the same limits of the old ones.
Posted 1 week ago
The world is a mess, and I just need to rule it.
Dr. Horrible, Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog
Posted 2 weeks ago
Posted 2 weeks ago
why do black people use you in the wrong context? such is "you ugly" instead of "you're ugly" I know u guys can differentiate, it's a nuisance
Anonymous asked

edwardspoonhands:

miniprof:

rsbenedict:

prettyboyshyflizzy:

you a bitch

It’s called copula deletion, or zero copula. Many languages and dialects, including Ancient Greek and Russian, delete the copula (the verb to be) when the context is obvious.

So an utterance like “you a bitch” in AAVE is not an example of a misused you, but an example of a sentence that deletes the copular verb (are), which is a perfectly valid thing to do in that dialect, just as deleting an /r/ after a vowel is a perfectly valid thing to do in an upper-class British dialect.

What’s more, it’s been shown that copula deletion occurs in AAVE exactly in those contexts where copula contraction occurs in so-called “Standard American English.” That is, the basic sentence “You are great” can become “You’re great” in SAE and “You great” in AAVE, but “I know who you are” cannot become “I know who you’re” in SAE, and according to reports, neither can you get “I know who you” in AAVE.

In other words, AAVE is a set of grammatical rules just as complex and systematic as SAE, and the widespread belief that it is not is nothing more than yet another manifestation of deeply internalized racism.

I love linguistics! 

Posted 2 weeks ago

Wow. Such resume. Much job stuff.

Wow.

Posted 3 weeks ago

Silence will fall when the question is asked.

Posted 3 weeks ago
1.
I say, ‘I am fat.’
He says ‘No, you are beautiful.’
I wonder why I cannot be both.
He kisses me 
hard.
Thought #1 from “10 Honest Thoughts on Being Loved By a Skinny Boy”, a poem by Rachel Wiley